Connect
To Top

Art & Life with Al Glann

Today we’d like to introduce you to Al Glann.

Al, please kick things off for us by telling us about yourself and your journey so far.
I went to art school to become an illustrator and graphic designer. I spent 7 years working full time in the field and free lanced for another 20 years while I was teaching. Design is design and I always had a passion for working three dimensionally. In the mid 80’s I started to spend more time creating sculpture vs. two-dimensional work, it became my priority. When I moved to Arizona in 1996 I focused on my sculpture in my personal time and taught Graphic Design at the Art Institute. In 2010 I finally had the opportunity and desire to take a chance on working full-time as an artist and figure out how to make a living at it.

I love the dimensional aspects of sculpture; we live in a three-dimensional world so my art has to have some dimension to it. I love design, I taught it for 29 years and it is a part of who I am. Early on I decided that I wanted my sculptures to be basically indestructible. If they fell over they would break whatever they hit but they would be fine. I love to work with steel; it does what I want my images and forms to do. I can twist it, bend it, grind it, weld it, texture it, and shape it to get the look I want. I have worked with a variety of other media but I always come back to steel. The bronze horses are originally created in steel then we make molds and then cast in bronze.

In describing my horses, I refer to them as my 3-dimensional gesture drawings. I have always loved the essence drawings and paintings of Sumi brush. Having learned it and taught it for a number of years it has always intrigued me as an artistic expression. What is the least amount you can put down to describe a character, a person or in my case a horse. What lines define the anatomy, the energy, and the personality? What artists put into their art is part of their soul; this is what you see and connect with. I’m from the Bauhaus design philosophy,” less is more”. I think the viewer has to become more involved with my work because they have to complete the image.

I have always loved the essence drawings and paintings of Sumi brush. Having learned it and taught it for a number of years it has always intrigued me as an artistic expression. What is the least amount you can put down to describe a character, a person or in my case a horse. What lines define the anatomy, the energy, and the personality? What artists put into their art is part of their soul; this is what you see and connect with. I’m from the Bauhaus design philosophy,” less is more”. I think the viewer has to become more involved with my work because they have to complete the image.

I have expanded animal series to include Steers, Bison, and birds. The Ravens have been a nice continuation of the horse series. According to Native American lore the Ravens are considered the spirit brothers of the horse. They are smart and I love shimmer of their feathers, they are a work in progress. Currently I am working on a flying Hawk that is a great pose, I’ll have it finished this month,

Can you give our readers some background on your art?
I think I answered most of this in the previous section.

What we as artists put out there is part of our soul, it is what we share with whoever takes the time to actually look and connect with our work. We base our souls to share what we have spoken, may it touch your heart and feed your spirit.

Do you think conditions are generally improving for artists? What more can cities and communities do to improve conditions for artists?
Art is a hard business whether you are an artist or a gallery. Many times, there is no rhyme or reason to the local art market. I think it has always been a tough nut to crack. In making your art, you have to first be true to yourself and follow what is inside you. I’m always looking at different art, styles, techniques, color schemes, etc. What is out there that I can use in my own work as I continue to develop as an artist. When I traveled this summer back to the Midwest, I spent time in a number of museums, I always find it inspiring.

I think one of the hardest parts of being an artist is learning how to market your work, how do you get it out there? I’m always looking for other ways to get my work out for people to see. I do a few good weekends shows in the west, I enter other museum shows around the country, I do print advertising in magazines, and I working on developing my digital media. I work with my galleries to see how we can present my work more effectively. I need to do more on Instagram to get my work out there and I do presentations at my galleries to show the process of my work. I still am looking for what else I can do to get my work in front of people that buy art. For most people art is not a necessity but a luxury but I do believe that art feeds your soul.

What’s the best way for someone to check out your work and provide support?
You can see a good range of my work on my website: alglannsculptor.com. I have a studio and a small gallery space at the Metal Arts Village at 3230 N. Dodge Blvd. Tucson, AZ.

I also have work in these galleries around the country:

New Editions Gallery, Lexington, KY
Mirada Gallery, Indian Hills, CO
Turquoise Tortoise Gallery, Sedona, AZ
CODA Gallery, Palm Desert, CA
Madaras Gallery Tucson, AZ
Texas Treasures Gallery Boerne, TX

Contact Info:

  • Address: 3230 N. Dodge Blvd., Ste. D Tucson, AZ 85716
  • Website: alglannsculptor.com
  • Phone: 480-560-3243
  • Email: aglann@comcast.net
  • Instagram: alglann
  • Facebook: Al Glann Studios


Image Credit:
Photographer Joe Brown

Getting in touch: VoyagePhoenix is built on recommendations from the community; it’s how we uncover hidden gems, so if you know someone who deserves recognition please let us know here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

More in